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State Accountability Resource Tool (StART) Educator Guide

Introduction

The NYCDOE State Accountability Resource Tool (StART) shares publicly available New York State Education Department (NYSED) accountability data for New York City public schools in an intuitive and user-friendly way. The StART links to other school performance tools such as the School Performance Dashboard, School Quality Guide, Renewal/Receivership Reports as well as New York state’s data.nysed.gov public reporting site.

The StART is organized into three different modules that focus on a different aspect of publicly available state accountability data:

This Educator Guide is a companion to the StART and provides more detailed information about New York State’s school accountability system including metrics, designations and terms.

ESSA Accountability

Overview

In December 2015 President Obama signed into law the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). ESSA required that states submit plans that outlined how they would implement requirements under ESSA including those related to how schools would be held accountability for performance. The New York State Education Department (NYSED) submitted its plan to the United States Department of Education (USDE) in September 2017 and received final approval for its plan from USDE in January 2018.

ESSA replaces the previous identification system and categories (Priority Schools, Focus Districts and Focus Schools, Local Assistance Plan Schools and Reward Schools - for more information on No Child Left Behind, see NCLB in the Appendix below) with Comprehensive Support & Improvement (CSI) Schools, Targeted Support & Improvement (TSI) Schools, Target Districts and Recognition Schools using a new identification process. The new identification process takes on a multiple measures approach and includes academic and non-academic measures of school performance. This new identification process will be implemented in school year 2018‑19 (based on data from the 2017‑18 school year and data from other prior years). As a result a new round of school designations will be made in school year 2018‑19.

The ESSA law requires each state to identify at least five percent of schools as in need of “Comprehensive Support and Improvement” based on poor performance on exam results, exam participation, graduation (for HS), and at least one other indicator which may be non-academic (e.g. chronic absenteeism). Using the same methods described above for identifying schools for Comprehensive Support and Improvement, NYSED will also identify schools that have accountability subgroups that are consistently underperforming as Targeted Support & Improvement, which will be required to develop and implement a school-level targeted support and improvement plan.

Under New York State’s new accountability system there are six measures at the elementary-middle school level:

There are seven accountability measures at the secondary level:

Performance on these measures is converted to an Achievement Level that ranges in value from 1 to 4. The achievement levels are then used to determine which of the aforementioned state accountability designations (Recognition, CSI and TSI) a school will receive. It is also important to note that schools can be identified to receive interventions if they demonstrate low performance (i.e. achievement level is equal to 1) on any accountability measure or if a school has consistently low participation rates on statewide assessments.

Metrics

Elementary-Middle Level Composite Performance Index (EMS Only)

The Composite Performance Index (CPI) metric at the elementary and middle school level measures achievement on state assessments in ELA, math and science for all students and each accountability subgroup. The CPI metric uses two sets of performance indices (PIs). 

A school’s performance on the two sets of PIs (Core Subject Performance Index and Weighted Academic Achievement Index) is ranked separately and then converted to an achievement level using the table shown below.

Performance Index Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

The two achievement levels are then combined resulting in a value of 2-8 to create the Composite Performance Index (CPI). A final rank is then performed on the CPI by first sorting schools using their combined achievement level (value from 2-8) and then by taking the value of the higher ranked set of PIs (Core Subject Performance Index or Weighted Academic Achievement Index). Using the same table shared above, schools are assigned a level 1-4 achievement level for the Composite Performance Index. 

For more information on how to calculate CPI see the Appendix.

Secondary Level Composite Performance Index (HS Only)

The Composite Performance Index (CPI) metric at the secondary level measures the achievement on state assessments in ELA, math, science and social studies for each student subgroup. Using the high school accountability cohort as the denominator a PI ranging in value from 0 to 250 is calculated for ELA, math, science and social studies separately. The CPI is then calculated by taking a weighted average (ELA and math PIs are given a weight of 3, science PI a weight of 2 and social studies PI a weight of 1) of these four PIs. A school’s performance on the CPI metric is ranked against the performance of all secondary level schools across the state and converted to an achievement level using the table shown below.

For more information on how to calculate CPI see the Appendix.

Performance Index Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Growth (EMS Only)

The Growth (Mean Growth Percentile) measure at the elementary and middle school is a three-year average of ELA and math Student Growth Percentiles (SGPs) values calculated for each student subgroup. More specifically the value for this measure is calculated by summing the SGPs in ELA and math for 2017‑18, 2016‑17 and 2015‑16 and dividing the result by the total count of SGPs in ELA and math for 2017‑18, 2016‑17 and 2015‑16. In order to be attributed to the Mean Growth Percentile, students must be continuously enrolled (i.e., they are enrolled on BEDS Day in the fall and assessment day in the spring). Performance on Growth is converted to an achievement level (1-4) using the table below.

Growth Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

45 or Less

1

45.1 to 50

2

50.1 to 54

3

Greater than 54

4

Graduation Rate (HS Only)

At the secondary level the Four-Year Graduation Rate Cohort, Five-Year Graduation Rate Cohort and Six-Year Graduation Rate Cohort are used as a measure of performance in three distinct ways:

67% Rule

Secondary schools that do not have a Four-, Five-, or Six-Year Graduation Rate Cohort with a graduation rate at or above 67% will be automatically identified as Comprehensive Support & Improvement (CSI).

Stand Alone Graduation Rate Metric

There is a stand-alone Graduation Rate metric that measures a school’s Four-, Five-, and Six-Year Cohorts graduation rate performance against state long-term goals and state and school Measures of Interim Progress (MIPs).

Graduation Rate for Combined Measure

Finally, the state will rank each school’s graduation rate for the Four-, Five-, and Six-Year Cohorts against the performance of all schools statewide separately. It will then assign an achievement level for each cohort and then average them together and round to the nearest whole number to determine which schools are the lowest-performing (bottom 10%) for the Combined measure. 

Combined Measure

Elementary-Middle Level

At the elementary-middle level the Combined measure is the sum of the rank order of the Composite Performance Index (CPI) and the rank order of the Growth measure. The sum is then ranked itself. Schools are assigned an achievement level using the table below.

Combined Percentile Rank to Achievement Level 

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Secondary Level

At the secondary level the Combined measure is the sum of the rank order of the Composite Performance Index (CPI) and the rank order of the Graduation Rate measure. The sum is then ranked itself. Schools are assigned an achievement level using the same table above.

Academic (ELA/Math) Progress

The Academic Progress or ELA/Math Progress metric measures how a student subgroup performs in ELA and math as reflected in the ELA and Math Performance Index calculated for the Weighted Average Achievement Index. Performance on the ELA and Math Performance Index is then compared to the state’s long-term goals and Measure of Interim Progress (MIP) and the school-specific MIP for that subgroup in a given school year. Schools are assigned an achievement level separately for the ELA PI and Math PI using the table below. 

empty table cell

Did Not Meet State Long-Term Goal

Met State Long-Term Goal

Exceeded State Long-Term Goal

Did not meet MIP

1

NA

NA

Met lower MIP

2

3

4

Met higher MIP

3

4

4

The two achievement levels are then averaged together and rounded down to determine an overall achievement level for this measure. 

ELL Progress

The English Language Proficiency (ELP) Progress metric measures the progress of English Language Learners (ELLs) in meeting their individual goals on the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT) using a Success Ratio. Continuously enrolled ELLs with a current and prior year NYSESLAT are counted in the denominator of the Success Ratio while only students who make annual progress towards meeting their expected goals towards English Language Proficiency are included in the numerator of the Success Ratio.

Chronic Absenteeism

The Chronic Absenteeism (CA) metric measures the percentage of students, for each student subgroup who miss 10% or more of the school year against state long-term goals and state and school MIPs. Students must be enrolled for a minimum of ten days and have attended school for at least one day to be included in the measure. This is the one indicator for which more than one school can be accountable for a student in a given school year. 

College, Career & Civic Readiness Index (HS Only)

The College, Career & Civic Readiness Index (CCCRI) metric at the secondary level measures the percentage of students in the accountability cohort who are leaving school prepared for college, career and civic readiness as measured by diplomas, credentials, advanced course credits and enrollment, career and technical education certifications, high school equivalency diplomas and other similar indicators against State long-term goals and State and school MIPs.

The CCCRI is calculated using achievements earned in the order of precedence table below, using the following formula:

Denominator: students in four-year graduation rate total cohort as of June 30th of the reporting year, plus students not in the cohort but who in the current reporting year were reported as English language learners and with a Regents diploma with a Seal of Biliteracy

Numerator: 2.0*(students in #1-10 in the order of precedence table) + 1.5*(students in #11-13 in the order of precedence table) +1.0*(students #14-16 in the order of precedence table) + 0.5*(students in #17-18 in the order of precedence table) + 0.0*(students in #19 in the order of precedence table)

Achievement Order of Precedence and Weighting

Order of Precedence

CCCR Achievement

Weight

1

Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation

2.0

2

Regents Diploma or Local Diploma with CTE Endorsement

2.0

3

Cohort Regents Diploma with Seal of Biliteracy

2.0

4

Annual Regents Diploma with Seal of Biliteracy

2.0

5

Regents Diploma and a score of 3 or higher on an AP Exam

2.0

6

Regents Diploma and a score of 4 or higher on IB exam

2.0

7

Regents Diploma and P-Tech credit

2.0

8

Regents Diploma and high school dual enrollment credit

2.0

9

(2018‑19 and beyond) Regents Diploma and the receipt of an industry-recognized credential or passage of nationally certified CTE examination

2.0

10

Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential with an average score of 4 on the New York State Alternate Assessment Examinations (NYSAA) in language arts, mathematics, and science.

2.0

11

Regents Diploma and high school credit earned through an AP or IB enrollment course

1.5

12

Regents Diploma with CDOS endorsement

1.5

13

Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential with an average score of 3 on the New York State Alternate Assessment Examinations (NYSAA) in language arts, mathematics, and science

1.5

14

Regents Diploma

1.0

15

Local Diploma

1.0

16

Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential with an average score of 2 on the New York State Alternate Assessment Examinations (NYSAA) in language arts, mathematics, and science

1.0

17

High School Equivalency Diploma

0.5

18

CDOS Credential

0.5

19

No High School or High School Equivalency Diploma

0.0

N-Size Requirements

Like the previous accountability system New York State will maintain N-size requirements for both participation and performance calculations. 

Performance

For Academic Achievement, Growth, Graduation Rate, Academic Progress, ELL Progress, Chronic Absenteeism and CCCRI measures there must be a minimum of 30 student results for a subgroup in order for a school to receive an accountability rating on an indicator. New York State will combine student results from the past two years if a school has less than 30 student results in the most recent school year for a measure. If after combining data from the past two years a school has at least 30 student results the state will provide an accountability rating for an indicator.

If after combining data for the past two years a school does not meet the minimum N-size requirement for a subgroup for the Academic Achievement measure the school will be held accountable using the established accountability process for small schools (i.e. Self Assessment). 

If a subgroup does not meet the N-size requirement for the Growth measure, a subgroup’s initial designation will be determined using the Academic Achievement measure only. As an example if the subgroup is identified as Level 1 for Academic Achievement it will also be identified as Level 1 for the Combined (Academic Achievement & Growth) measure. 

If a subgroup does not meet the N-size requirement for the Graduation Rate measure, a subgroup’s initial designation will be determined using the Academic Achievement measure only. As an example if the subgroup is identified as Level 1 for Academic Achievement then the subgroup will also be identified as Level 1 for the Combined (Academic Achievement & Graduation Rate) measure.

If an achievement level is calculated for the Combined measure for a subgroup using the process described above and the subgroup meets N-size requirements for at least one of the following measures, an accountability designation will be made using the available measures.

If an achievement level is calculated for the Combined measure for a subgroup using the process described above and the subgroup does not meet N-size requirements for none of the measures listed above then the school will be held accountable using the established accountability process for small schools (i.e. Self Assessment).

Participation 

For participation rate calculations New York State requires a subgroup to have a minimum of 40 student results. The state will combine data for the past two years in the event that a subgroup has less than 40 student results in the most recent year.

Self-Assessment Process

More information about the Self-Assessment Process for schools that do not meet N-size requirements for performance calculations will be shared at a later date. Schools subject to the Self-Assessment process includes new elementary/middle schools that did not have a sufficient number of student tested in grades 3-8 in the 2017‑18 school year as well as new high schools that did not have a graduating cohort in 2017‑18. 

Designations

Comprehensive Support & Improvement Schools (CSI)

The CSI designation is used to identify the lowest-performing schools in New York state based on the performance of all students. There are three ways that schools can be identified as CSI:

The Decision Rules used to identify schools as low performing are shown below for elementary-middle level and secondary level schools.

Elementary-Middle CSI Decision Rules

Scenario

Composite Performance

Growth

Combined

ELP Progress

Academic Progress

Chronic Absenteeism

1

Both Level 1

Level 1

Any

Automatically identified

2

Any One Level 1

Level 1

None

Either one Level 1

3

Any One Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Automatically identified

4

Any One Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Either one Level 1

5

Any One Level 1

Level 1

Level 3-4

Both Level 1

Secondary Level CSI Decision Rules

Scenario

Composite Performance

Graduation Rate

Combined

ELL Progress

Academic Progress

Chronic Absenteeism

CCCRI

1

Both Level 1

Level 1

Any

Automatically identified

2

Either one Level 1

Level 1

None

Any one Level 1

3

Either one Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Automatically identified

4

Either one Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Any one Level 1

5

Either one Level 1

Level 1

Level 3-4

Any two Level 1

Schools will first be identified as CSI in the 2018‑19 school year based on data from 2017‑18 and other prior years. CSI schools are identified every three years so after 2018‑19 the next time schools will be designated as CSI is in the 2021‑22 school year and the 2024-25 school year after that. In order to be removed from status, schools designated as CSI must show progress for two consecutive years by having performance above that used to identify CSI schools. Schools that fail to be removed from status and are re-identified as a CSI school during the next identification year (i.e. 2021‑22, 2024‑25, etc.) will also be identified as a Receivership School and subject to additional intervention and performance requirements. Receivership Schools are subject to closure or independent Receivership if they fail to meet annual performance requirements. 

CSI Exit Criteria

To exit CSI status, a CSI school must, for two consecutive years, be above the levels that would cause it to be identified for CSI status. Schools may exit CSI status if, for two consecutive years:

Targeted Support & Improvement Schools (TSI)

The TSI designation is used to identify the lowest performing schools in New York State based on the performance of the accountability subgroups. The Decision Rules used to identify schools as CSI (see tables above) are applied to the performance of the accountability subgroups in order to determine if they are low performing and designated as TSI.

Schools currently designated as Priority or Focus can be identified as TSI beginning in the 2018‑19 school year based on data from 2017‑18 with the possibility of all other schools being identified as TSI beginning in the 2019-20 school year. Unlike CSI, schools can be identified as TSI any school year. In order to be removed from status schools designated as TSI are required to show progress for two consecutive years by having performance that is above the levels that would cause the school to be identified for a low-performing subgroup of students. In addition the school must not be newly identified for any subgroup of students. Schools that do meet the removal criteria will remain identified as TSI If a school remains identified as TSI after three consecutive years it will be identified as a CSI school.

TSI Exit Criteria

To exit TSI status, a TSI school must, for two consecutive years, be above the levels that would cause it to be identified for TSI status. Schools may exit TSI status if, for two consecutive years:

Good Standing

The Good Standing designation is the default accountability designation for schools in New York State. Schools that are not identified as low performing (CSI, TSI) or that demonstrate high performance/progress (Recognition) will be identified as Good Standing. The majority of New York City Schools are designated as Good Standing each year.

Recognition

The Recognition school designation replaces the Reward school designation and is used to identify schools that have demonstrated either high performance or high progress. We are still awaiting NYSED to share the business rules for identifying Recognition Schools. 

Intervention Programs for Low Performing Schools

Renewal and Rise Program

The Renewal School Program was an intervention program for schools that NYCDOE identified as low performing in 2014-15. The NYCDOE identified schools as Renewal if they met all of the following criteria or were added per the Chancellor’s discretion:

Renewal Schools were required to meet annual targets on performance benchmarks that are shared in the Renewal/Receivership Reports. Renewal Schools that have demonstrated strong improvement graduated from the program in 2017‑18 and were then considered Rise Schools. Rise Schools were required to continue to show progress on annual targets. Current Renewal and Rise schools will keep their designations for the remainder of the 2018‑19 school year. For more information on Renewal and Rise Schools, please see the Schools NYC website.

Receivership Program

The Receivership School program is an intervention program for schools that the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identifies as low performing. There were 62 Receivership Schools initially identified in 2014-15 based on the following criteria:

Receivership Schools are required to show “demonstrable improvement” by meeting the majority (67%) of their annual targets on performance benchmarks that are shared in the Renewal/Receivership Reports. Schools that do not show demonstrable improvement are subject to school closure. Receivership Schools can only be removed from the program if they are removed from Priority School status. The next opportunity for schools to be removed from Receivership status will be in 2018‑19 when new state designations under the ESSA accountability system are shared. Receivership Schools not identified as CSI will be removed from status. Receivership Schools that are identified as CSI will remain in the Receivership program. Schools designated as Priority but are not Receivership will be identified as Receivership if they are identified as CSI next year. 

Definitions, Terms & Acronyms

Cohort Definitions

2014 ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies Accountability Cohort

For ELA, math, science, and social studies Composite Performance, the 2014 accountability cohort consists of all students, regardless of their current grade level, who were:

  1. enrolled in your school or district on October 4, 2017 (BEDS day), and
  2. first entered grade 9 (anywhere) during the 2014‑15 school year (July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015) or, in the case of ungraded students with disabilities, reached their seventeenth birthday during the 2014‑15 school year. For Performance Accountability, the cohort year of students whose last enrollment record as of the reporting date has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using their birth date, even if they have a conflicting entry in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field. Ungraded students are included in the 2014 school accountability cohort if their birth date is between July 1, 1997 and June 30, 1998.

2013 Graduation-Rate Total Cohort (4-Year) for Accountability

The 2013 graduation rate total cohort for accountability (4 year as of August) consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2017, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2013‑14 school year (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014), regardless of their current grade level. The enrollment count is based on enrollment records as of June 30, 2017. The graduate count includes diplomas awarded through August 31, 2017.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

2012 Graduation-Rate Total Cohort (5-Year) for Accountability

The 2012 graduation rate total cohort for accountability (5 year as of August) consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2017, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2012‑13 school year (July 1, 2012 – June 30, 2013), regardless of their current grade level. The enrollment count is based on enrollment records as of June 30, 2017. The graduate count includes diplomas awarded through August 31, 2017.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

2011 Graduation Rate Total Cohort (6-Year) for Accountability

The 2011 graduation rate total cohort for accountability (6 year as of August) consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2017, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2011‑12 school year (July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012), regardless of their current grade level. The enrollment count is based on enrollment records as of June 30, 2017. The graduate count includes diplomas awarded through August 31, 2017.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

2014 Graduation-Rate Total Cohort (4-Year for College, Career, and Civic Readiness (CCCR) for Accountability

The 2014 graduation rate total cohort for CCCR for accountability (4 year as of June) consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2018, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2014‑15 school year (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015), regardless of their current grade level. The enrollment count is based on enrollment records as of June 30, 2018. The achievements earned are through June 30, 2018.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

2014 Total Cohort as of June and August of the 4th Year of School

The 2014 total cohort consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2018, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2014‑15 school year (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015), regardless of their current grade level.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

2013 Total Cohort as of June and August of the 5th Year of School

The 2013 total cohort consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2018, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2012‑13 school year (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014), regardless of their current grade level.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

2012 Total Cohort as of June of the 6th Year of School

The 2012 total cohort consists of all students, based on last enrollment record as of June 30, 2018, with a First Date of Entry into Grade 9 during the 2012‑13 school year (July 1, 2012 – June 30, 2013), regardless of their current grade level.

The cohort year for students whose last enrollment record has a grade of “14” (i.e., 7–12 ungraded) is identified using the date reported in the First Date of Entry into Grade 9 field; in circumstances when no date has been reported for an ungraded student, cohort year will be the school year the student turned 17.

General Terms & Acronyms

Achievement Level

A value ranging from 1-4 that summarizes the performance on ESSA accountability measures. 

Armed Forces Child

A student with one or more parent or guardian who is a member of the Armed Forces and on Active Duty. The Armed Forces are the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, the Coast Guard, or full-time National Guard. Active duty means full-time duty in the active military service of the United States. Such term includes full-time training duty, annual training duty, and attendance, while in the active military service, at a school designated as a service school by law or by the Secretary of the military department concerned.

Backmapping

Backmapping is a process used to assign accountability status to feeder schools within a district. Backmapping attributes the grade 3 assessment score of a student to the feeder school in which the student was enrolled in earlier grades as well as to the school in which the student took the assessment. The data of continuously enrolled students from each feeder school are aggregated to determine the accountability of those schools. See http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/sirs for a list of backmapping schools.

BEDS Code

A BEDS code is a 12-digit Basic Educational Data System (BEDS) code assigned by the New York State Education Department that uniquely identifies schools, districts, and other institutions. BEDS codes can be found at: http://portal.nysed.gov/portal/pls/pref/SED.sed_inst_qry_vw$.startup.

BEDS Day

The first Wednesday in October. For the 2017‑18 school year BEDS Day was October 4, 2017. For the 2018-18 school year BEDS Day will be October 3, 2018. BEDS Day is used to establish continuous enrollment for students in grades 3-8.

Continuously Enrolled Students

At the elementary/middle level, continuously enrolled students are those enrolled in the school or district on BEDS day (usually the first Wednesday in October) of the school year and during the testing period for the New York State Testing Program assessments.

Chronically Absent

A student who has excused or unexcused absences equaling 10% or more of enrolled school days. Days absent because of suspension or medical reasons are not used for this determination.

Dropout

A dropout is any student, regardless of age, who left school prior to graduation for any reason except death or leaving the country and has not been documented to have entered another program leading to a high school diploma or an approved program leading to a high school equivalency diploma. The NYSED reports an annual and cohort dropout rate. A student who leaves during the school year without documentation of a transfer to another program leading to a high school diploma or to an approved high school equivalency program or to a high school equivalency preparation program is counted as a dropout unless the student resumes school attendance before the end of the school year. The student’s registration for the next school year does not exempt him or her from dropout status in the current school year. Students who resume and continue enrollment until graduation are not counted as dropouts in the cohort dropout calculation. In computing annual dropout rates, students who are reported as having been counted by the same school as a dropout in a previous school year are not counted as a dropout in the current school year.

Economically Disadvantaged

Economically disadvantaged students are those who participate in, or whose family participates in, economic assistance programs, such as the free or reduced-price lunch programs, Social Security Insurance (SSI), Food Stamps, Foster Care, Refugee Assistance (cash or medical assistance), Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP), Safety Net Assistance (SNA), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), or Family Assistance: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). If one student in a family is identified as low income, all students from that household (economic unit) may be identified as low income.

ELL/MLL

English Language Learner/Multilingual Learner.

Embargoed Data

Embargoed data are data that cannot be discussed at public meetings or released to the public or the media until the NYSED public release date. This public release is often made by the Commissioner. Data that have been publicly released to the media or can be found on SED's website are not embargoed. For example, 3-8 ELA/math assessment scores are generally publicly released prior to the public release of The New York State Report Cards, which also contain data on these assessments. Therefore, data on these assessments are not embargoed after the initial public release. Annual Regents examination data, however, are not part of a separate public release prior to the release of The New York State Report Cards. As such, these data are embargoed until the public release of report cards. Even if data are embargoed, they may be used for internal district operations, including program and instructional planning for students and communication with individual parents about their child's academic needs.

English Language Learner/Multilingual Learner

ELLs/MLLs are those from a home where a language other than English is spoken and score below a State designated level of proficiency on NYSITELL or NYSESLAT.

ESEA

Elementary and Secondary Education Act. For more information see: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/accountability/ESEAFlexibilityWaiver.html or https://www.ed.gov/esea.

ESSA

Every Student Succeeds Act. For more information see: https://www.ed.gov/essa.

Ever ELL

Students who were identified as English Language Learners (ELL/MLL) in any year prior to the current year and who are not identified as an ELL/MLL in the current year are considered “Ever ELL/MLL.” Prior to the 2015‑16 school year, Ever ELL also included those students who were identified as current ELL/LEP students for that school year.

Feeder School

A feeder school is an early-grade elementary school that does not serve students in grade 3 or above (i.e., its enrollment is restricted to PK–1, K–1, PK–2, K–2, or 1–2) and, therefore, does not administer State assessments. Schools serving grade 3 students received from a feeder school within the district are required to identify the feeder school.

Former ELL

Students who are not identified as ELL/MLL in the current school year but who were identified in at least one of the previous two school years are considered “Former ELL.”

Former Student with a Disability (SWD)

Students who are not identified as students with a disability in the current school year but who were identified in at least one of the previous two school years are considered “Former Students with Disabilities.”

Foster Care Child

A child in foster care is one who has been placed in a foster family home, foster home of relatives, group home, emergency shelter, residential facility, child care institution, and pre-adoptive home. A child is in foster care in accordance with this definition regardless of whether the foster care facility is licensed, and payments are made by the State, tribal, or local agency for the care of the child, whether adoption subsidy payments are being made prior to the finalization of an adoption, or whether there is federal matching of any payments that are made.

FRPL

Free and Reduced-Price Lunch.

GED

General Education Diploma. Now known as High School Equivalency (HSE) diploma.

Gender

Gender of the student being reported, as identified by the student. In the case of very young transgender students not yet able to advocate for themselves, gender may be identified by the parent or guardian.

Grade Level

Instructional level for the student, as determined by the school district. Pre-Kindergarten counts include half- and full-day students. Students classified by districts as "pre-first" are included in first grade counts. Ungraded students are those assigned to a class that is not organized on the basis of grade grouping and has no standard grade designation. This includes both regular and special classes that have no grade designations. Such a class may contain students of different ages who are identified according to level of performance in one or more areas of instruction, rather than according to grade level or age level. The definition of 'Ungraded' does not include out-of-school youth, preschoolers, or children who are not yet school age. Ungraded Elementary includes ungraded students who are age equivalent to students in Kindergarten through 6th grade. Ungraded Secondary includes ungraded students who are age equivalent to students in 7th through 12th grade.

High School Graduate

Student awarded a local or Regents diploma.

High School Equivalency Preparation Programs

High school equivalency preparation programs fall into the following categories:

Homebound Student

Homebound students (also known as home-tutored students) fall into two categories: a) students who remain enrolled in a school but are provided temporary instruction in the home, and b) students who are unable to attend school for the remainder of the school year because of a physical, mental, or emotional illness or injury substantiated by a licensed physician or, for students with disabilities, are placed in homebound instruction by the CSE and are instructed at home or in a hospital by a tutor provided by the district of responsibility.

Home-schooled Student

A home-schooled student is a student who is instructed at home by a parent, guardian, or tutor employed by the parent or guardian and by request of the parent or guardian and has a home-school plan approved and supervised by the district. Home-schooled students need to be reported in SIRS only if they take a State assessment.

Homeless Student

A homeless student is one who; 1) lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence; or 2) has a primary nighttime location that is a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations including, but not limited to, shelters operated or approved by the State or local department of social services, and residential programs for runaway and homeless youth or a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including a car, park, public space, abandoned building, substandard housing, bus, train stations, or similar setting. Homeless students do not include children in foster care placement or receiving educational services.

IDEA

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

IEP

Individualized Education Program.

IESP

Individualized Education Services Program.

Immigrant

Immigrant children and youth are defined as individuals who are aged 3 through 21, were not born in the U.S. and have not been attending one or more schools in any one or more States for more than 3 full academic years. The months need not be consecutive.

L2RPT

The New York State Education Department’s student level data reporting system. L2RPT contains accountability data verification reports that schools can review and verify for accuracy. L2RPT can be accessed by school administrators through this link.

Long-term Absence

Any student who has been absent without a valid excuse for twenty (20) or more consecutive days as of the last expected day of attendance for the school year should be coded as a “long-term absence.”

Mean Growth Percentile (MGP)

The average of Student Growth Percentiles (SGPs). For school accountability purposes, New York State currently uses a school’s or subgroup’s unweighted two-year average MGP in ELA and Math. To further increase the stability and reliability of this measure, NYS will use a three year average MGP (i.e. three year average of SGPs) in ELA and math to calculate a school Growth Index value.

Medically Excused

Students who are incapacitated by illness or injury during the test administration and make-up periods at the elementary/middle level and have on file documentation from a medical practitioner that they were too incapacitated to complete the test at the school, at home, or in a medical setting are considered medically excused from testing. These students are not included in the accountability calculations for schools, districts, or the State. Students at the secondary level may not be medically excused from testing.

Migrant

A student is a migrant child if the student is, or the student's parents, spouse, or guardian is, a migratory agricultural worker, including a migratory dairy worker or a migratory fisher, and who, in the preceding 36 months, in order to obtain, or accompany such parent, spouse, or guardian in order to obtain, temporary or seasonal employment in agricultural or fishing work: has moved from one school district to another; or resides in a school district of more than 15,000 square miles and migrates a distance of 20 miles or more to a temporary residence to engage in temporary or seasonal employment in agriculture or fishing. All students eligible to be served by programs supported with Title I - Part C funds should have a Certificate of Eligibility signed by a parent or guardian and filed with the Superintendent of schools.

Noncompleter

Beginning with the 2001‑02 school year, any student who dropped out or entered a high school equivalency preparation program will be counted as a high school noncompleter. Each high school’s noncompletion rate (the sum of the dropout rate and the transfer-to-high-school-equivalency-preparation-program rate) will be reported on the New York State School Report Card along with the two component rates. Federal standards require that students leaving high school diploma programs to enter equivalency programs be counted as noncompleters.

New York State Alternate Assessment (NYSAA)

The New York State Alternate Assessments are administered in English language arts (ELA) and mathematics to ungraded students with severe cognitive disabilities whose ages are equivalent to graded students in grades 3 through 8 and secondary level. They are administered in science to students with disabilities age equivalent to graded students in grades 4, 8, and secondary level. And they are administered in social studies at the secondary level only. Students identified by their district's Committee on Special Education as eligible to take the New York State Alternate Assessment (NYSAA) may use this assessment to fulfill the participation and performance criteria for elementary/middle- and secondary-level English language arts and mathematic and elementary/middle-level science for accountability.

NYSED

New York State Education Department.

New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT)

The New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Tests are administered in grades K through 12 to limited English proficient students.

NYSITELL

New York State Identification Test for English Language Learners.

NYSSIS

New York State Student Identifier System.

New York State Testing Program (NYSTP)

The New York State Testing Program (NYSTP) assessments are administered annually in English language arts (ELA) and mathematics in grades 3 through 8.

Participation Rate

The percentage of students enrolled during the New York State NYTSP test administration that have a valid test score.

Performance Index (PI)

A PI is a value from 0 to 250 that is assigned to an accountability group, indicating how that group performed on a required State test (or approved alternative).

Elementary-Middle Level ELA, Math & Science (for Core Subject Performance Index)

Student scores on the tests are converted to four performance levels, from Level 1 to Level 4. A PI is calculated using the levels and the following equation: ([(Count at Level 2) + 2(Count at Level 3) + 2.5(Count at Level 4)] ÷ [Count of Continuously Enrolled and Tested Students]) × 100

Elementary-Middle Level ELA & Math (for Weighted Academic Achievement)

Student scores on the tests are converted to four performance levels, from Level 1 to Level 4. A PI is calculated using the levels and the following equation: ([(Count at Level 2) + 2(Count at Level 3) + 2.5(Count at Level 4)] ÷ [Greater of Count of Continuously Enrolled and Tested Students or 95% of Continuously Enrolled Students]) × 100

Elementary-Middle Level Science (for Weighted Academic Achievement)

Student scores on the tests are converted to four performance levels, from Level 1 to Level 4. A PI is calculated using the levels and the following equation: ([(Count at Level 2) + 2(Count at Level 3) + 2.5(Count at Level 4)] ÷ [Greater of Count of Continuously Enrolled and Tested Students or 95% of Continuously Enrolled Students]) × 100

Secondary Level ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies

Student scores on the tests are converted to four performance levels, from Level 1 to Level 4. A PI is calculated using the levels and the following equation: ([(Count at Level 2) + 2(Count at Level 3) + 2.5(Count at Level 4)] ÷ [Count of Students in the Accountability Cohort]) × 100

Race/Ethnicity

American Indian or Alaska Native

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.

Asian

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, including Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Black or African American

A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

Hispanic or Latino

A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

White

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East.

Multiracial

A person who is mixed race.

RCT

Regents Competency Test.

School Choice

Each school district with a Title I school in school improvement or corrective action status must authorize students in the school to transfer to another public school in the district that has not been identified for Title I improvement. In providing the transfer option, the district must give priority to the lowest-achieving students from low income families. The district must pay the cost of transportation for students participating in this option.

School Year

A school year is July 1 through June 30.

Subgroup

This refers to the following student subgroups:

Accountability Subgroups (Used to make accountability determinations)
Non-Accountability Subgroups

Success Ratio

The Success Ratio is a measure of how successful ELL students are at meeting expected goals towards English Language Proficiency. Continuously enrolled ELLs with a current and prior year NYSESLAT score are counted in the denominator. Only students who make annual progress are included in the numerator. 

Student Growth Percentile (SGP)

A statistic that measures a student’s current year score relative to other students with similar prior test score histories. SGPs are computed for students who have valid test score in the current year and a valid test score in that same subject in the prior year in the grade immediately below the student’s current grade. 

Transgender Students

Students whose gender identity does not correspond to their assigned sex at birth.

United States

The term "United States" means all fifty States of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa, Northern Marianna Islands, US Minor Outlying Islands and US Virgin Islands.

Valid Score

A valid score is a score received on an assessment. Administrative errors, medically excused, refusals, and absences are not considered valid scores.

Support

More ESSA related information and resources are available to NYCDOE school staff on the DOE Wiki. NYCDOE school staff that would like additional support with ESSA accountability should reach out to their Performance & Assessment Leads.

The general public can also find more information on New York State’s public web page.

Appendix

I. Example: Calculating EMS Composite Performance Index (CPI)

Step 1: Calculate English and Math Achievement Indices using the formula and denominator indicated below:

Calculate English and Math Achievement Indices using the formula and denominator indicated

Denominator = the greater of 1) continuously enrolled students who have valid test scores OR 2) 95% of continuously enrolled students with or without valid test scores.
Note: Continuously enrolled students are those students who are enrolled on BEDS day and also enrolled during the test administration period.

Step 2: Calculate a Combined ELA and Math Achievement Index by summing the ELA and math numerators and ELA and math denominators from Step 1, dividing the combined numerator by the combined denominator, and multiplying that result by 100.

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Achievement Index

Subject

# of Continuously Enrolled Students

# of Continuously Enrolled Tested Students

95% of Continuously Enrolled Students

# Level 1

# Level 2

# Level 3

# Level 4

Numerator

Denominator

Index

ELA

100

90

95

20

20

30

20

130

95

137

Math

102

100

97

10

30

40

20

160

100

160

ELA & Math Achievement Index

202

190

192

30

50

70

40

290

195

149

Step 3: Calculate Science Achievement Index using the formula and denominator indicated below:

Calculate Science Achievement Index using the formula and denominator indicated

Denominator = the greater of 1) continuously enrolled students who have valid test scores OR 2) 95% of continuously enrolled students with or without valid test scores.

Example of Science Achievement Index

Subject

# of Continuously Enrolled Students

# of Continuously Enrolled Tested Students

95% of Continuously Enrolled Students

# Level 1

# Level 2

# Level 3

# Level 4

Numerator

Denominator

Index

Science

100

90

95

20

20

30

20

130

95

137

Step 4: Calculate a weighted average of the Combined ELA and Math Achievement Indices and the Science Achievement Index using the following steps:

  1. Sum the Combined ELA and Math Achievement Index and the Science Index numerators
  2. Sum the Combined ELA and Math Achievement Index and Science Index denominators
  3. Divide the resulting numerator by the resulting denominator
  4. Multiply that result by 100.

Compute only for groups with 30 or more combined ELA, Math, & Science results for continuously enrolled students.

Calculate a weighted average of the Combined ELA and Math Achievement Indices and the Science Achievement Index

Numerator = ELA[(Level 2)+2(Level 3)+2.5(Level 4)] + Math[(Level 2)+2(Level 3)+2.5(Level 4)] + Science[(Level 2)+2(Level 3)+2.5(Level 4)]

Denominator = ELA (greater of continuously enrolled tested and 95% of continuously enrolled) + Math (greater of continuously enrolled tested and 95% of continuously enrolled) + Science (greater of continuously enrolled tested and 95% of continuously enrolled)

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Weighted Average Index

Subject

# of Continuously Enrolled Students

# of Continuously Enrolled Tested Students

95% of Continuously Enrolled Students

# Level 1

# Level 2

# Level 3

# Level 4

Numerator

Denominator

Index

Achievement Index

202

190

192

30

50

70

40

290

195

149

Science

100

90

95

20

20

30

20

130

95

137

Weighted Average Index

302

280

287

50

70

100

60

420

290

145

Step 5: Rank order schools by their Weighted Average Index from Step 4. The higher the rank, the better the performance. In the example in Step 4, the Weighted Average Index is 145. In the sample below, we call this school “School T.” If NYS had 20 schools, Schools A through T, with Weighted Average Indices ranging from 25 to 240, School T would be ranked 13, as indicated in the example below.

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level
Weighted Average Index Ranking

School

Weighted Average Index

Rank

School J

25

1

School A

55

2

School F

70

3

School S

85

4

School D

92

5

School N

100

6

School G

110

7

School B

115

8

School Q

119

9

School C

125

10

School R

135

11

School I

140

12

School T

145

13

School O

166

14

School E

180

15

School K

181

16

School L

188

17

School H

209

18

School M

235

19

School P

240

20

Step 6: Assign a Level based on where the school fell in the rank and the table below. In the case of School T, the rank is within the 50.1 to 75% range compared to the other 19 schools, so School T would receive a Level 3, as indicated below.

Weighted Average
Achievement Level Assignment

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level
Weighted Average Index Level

School

Rank

Rank Average

Weighted Average Index Level

School J

1

10% or Less

1

School A

2

10% or Less

1

School F

3

10.1 to 50%

2

School S

4

10.1 to 50%

2

School D

5

10.1 to 50%

2

School N

6

10.1 to 50%

2

School G

7

10.1 to 50%

2

School B

8

10.1 to 50%

2

School Q

9

10.1 to 50%

2

School C

10

10.1 to 50%

2

School R

11

50.1 to 75%

3

School I

12

50.1 to 75%

3

School T

13

50.1 to 75%

3

School O

14

50.1 to 75%

3

School E

15

50.1 to 75%

3

School K

16

Greater than 75%

4

School L

17

Greater than 75%

4

School H

18

Greater than 75%

4

School M

19

Greater than 75%

4

School P

20

Greater than 75%

4

Step 7: Calculate an elementary/middle-level Core Subject Index for ELA, Math, and Science using the following steps:

  1. Sum the numerators and denominators
  2. Divide the summed numerator by the summed denominator
  3. Multiply the result by 100 to create a Core Subject Index

Where the Weighted Average N for ELA, Math, and Science combined (over two years, if necessary to combine) is equal to or greater than 30 and the Core Subject N for ELA, Math, and Science combined over two years is less than 30, calculate a Core Subject Index for groups with 15 or more combined ELA, Math, and Science students over two years AND where the N size for the Core Subject calculation is at least 50% of the N size for the Weighted Average calculation.

Calculate an elementary/middle-level Core Subject Index for ELA, Math, and Science

Denominator = continuously enrolled students (students enrolled on BEDS day—usually the first Wednesday in October—and during the test administration period) who have valid test scores.

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Core Subject Index

Subject

# of Continuously Enrolled Tested Students

# Level 1

# Level 2

# Level 3

# Level 4

Numerator

Denominator

Index

ELA

95

25

20

30

20

130

95

137

Math

100

10

30

40

20

160

100

160

Science

40

0

10

14

16

78

40

195

Core Subject Index

235

35

60

84

56

368

235

157

Step 8: Rank order schools by their Core Subject Index from Step 7. In the example in Step 7, the Core Subject Index is 157. In the sample below, we call this school “School T.” If NYS had 20 schools, Schools A through T, with Core Subject Indices ranging from 28 to 240, School T would be ranked 10, as indicated in the example below.

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level
Core Subject Index Ranking

School

Core Subject Index

Rank

School J

28

1

School S

86

2

School D

99

3

School F

110

4

School G

110

5

School B

115

6

School A

125

7

School C

140

8

School R

140

9

School T

157

10

School N

160

11

School O

168

12

School I

170

13

School L

188

14

School Q

190

15

School K

190

16

School H

215

17

School E

220

18

School M

240

19

School P

240

20

Step 9: Assign a Level based on where the school fell in the rank and the table below. In the case of School T, the rank is within the 10.1 to 50% range compared to the other 19 schools, so School T would receive a Level 2 for the Core Subject Index, as indicated below.

Core Subject Level Assignment

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Core Subject Index Level

School

Rank

Rank Range

Core Subject Level

School J

1

10% or Less

1

School S

2

10% or Less

1

School D

3

10.1 to 50%

2

School F

4

10.1 to 50%

2

School G

5

10.1 to 50%

2

School B

6

10.1 to 50%

2

School A

7

10.1 to 50%

2

School C

8

10.1 to 50%

2

School R

9

10.1 to 50%

2

School T

10

10.1 to 50%

2

School N

11

50.1 to 75%

3

School O

12

50.1 to 75%

3

School I

13

50.1 to 75%

3

School L

14

50.1 to 75%

3

School Q

16

50.1 to 75%

3

School K

15

Greater than 75%

4

School H

17

Greater than 75%

4

School E

18

Greater than 75%

4

School M

19

Greater than 75%

4

School P

20

Greater than 75%

4

Step 10: Sum the Weighted Average Index Level from Step 6 and the Core Subject Index Level from Step 8 for a Combined Level from 2 to 8.

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Combined Levels

School

Weighted Average Index Level

Core Subject Level

Combined Level

School J

1

1

2

School S

2

1

3

School A

1

2

3

School F

2

2

4

School D

2

2

4

School G

2

2

4

School B

2

2

4

School C

2

2

4

School N

2

3

5

School K

4

4

8

School R

3

2

5

School T

3

2

5

School Q

2

3

5

School I

3

3

6

School O

3

3

6

School L

4

3

7

School E

3

4

7

School H

4

4

8

School K

4

4

8

School M

4

4

8

Step 11: For schools with the same Combined Level, rank schools using the higher of the Weighted Average Index Rank and the Core Subject Index Rank to determine the Final Rank.

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Final Rank Ranking

School

Weighted Average Index Rank

Core Subject Rank

Higher Rank

Combined Level

Final Rank

School J

1

1

1

2

1

School S

4

2

4

3

2

School A

2

7

7

3

3

School F

3

4

4

4

4

School D

5

3

5

4

5

School G

7

5

7

4

6

School B

8

6

8

4

7

School C

10

8

10

4

8

School N

6

11

11

5

9

School R

11

9

11

5

10

School T

13

10

13

5

11

School Q

9

15

15

5

12

School I

12

13

13

6

13

School O

14

12

14

6

14

School L

17

14

17

7

15

School E

15

18

18

7

16

School K

16

16

16

8

17

School H

18

17

18

8

18

School M

19

19

19

8

19

School P

20

20

20

8

20

Step 12: Rank schools based on that Final Rank using the table below to determine the final Composite Performance Index Level. In the case of Sample School T, the Composite Level is 3.

Composite Performance Index
Level Assignment

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Example of Elementary/Middle-Level Final
Composite Performance Index Level

School

Final Rank

Composite Level

School J

1

1

School S

2

1

School A

3

2

School F

4

2

School D

5

2

School G

6

2

School B

7

2

School C

8

2

School N

9

2

School R

10

2

School T

11

3

School Q

12

3

School I

13

3

School O

14

3

School L

15

3

School E

16

4

School K

17

4

School H

18

4

School M

19

4

School P

20

4

II. Example: Calculating HS Composite Performance Index (CPI)

Step 1: Calculate Performance Indices (PI) for English Language Arts (ELA), mathematics, science, and social studies at the secondary level using the following formula and denominator:

Calculate Performance Indices (PI) for English Language Arts (ELA), mathematics, science, and social studies at the secondary level using the following formula and denominator

Denominator = four-year cohort as of June 30 (students who entered grade 9 in the same year and were enrolled in the school/district/state on June 30th four years later).

Example of Secondary-Level Performance Indices

Subject

# of Students in Cohort

# L1

# L2

# L3

# L4

Numerator

Denominator

PI

ELA

100

10

20

30

40

180

100

180

Math

100

10

30

40

20

160

100

160

Science

100

40

30

20

10

95

100

95

Social Studies

100

25

25

25

25

138

100

138

Step 2: Calculate a Composite Performance Index using the following formula:

Calculate a Composite Performance Index using the following formula

Example of Secondary-Level Composite Performance Index

Subject

PI

Weight

Weighted Value

Composite Performance Index

ELA

180

3

(180 x 3) = 540

1,348 ÷ 9 = 149.8

Math

160

3

(160 x 3) = 480

Science

95

2

(95 x 2) = 190

Social Studies

138

1

(138 x 1) = 138

empty table cell empty table cell

Sum = 9

Sum = 1348

150

Step 3: Rank schools based on their Composite Performance Index from Step 2. In the example in Step 2, the Composite Performance Index is 150. In the sample below, we call this school “School T.” If NYS had 20 schools, Schools A through T, with Composite Performance Indices ranging from 28 to 240, School T would be ranked 10, as indicated in the example below.

Example of Secondary-Level Composite
Performance Index Rating

School

Composite Performance Index

Rank

School J

28

1

School S

86

2

School D

99

3

School F

110

4

School G

110

5

School B

115

6

School A

125

7

School C

140

8

School R

140

9

School T

150

10

School N

160

11

School O

168

12

School I

170

13

School L

188

14

School Q

190

16

School K

190

15

School H

215

17

School E

220

18

School M

240

19

School P

240

20

Step 4: Assign a Composite Performance Achievement Level based on where the school fell in the rank and the table below. In the case of School T, the rank is within the 10.1 to 50% range compared to the other 19 schools, so School T would receive a Level 2, as indicated below.

Composite Performance
Achievement Level Assignment

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Example of Secondary-Level Composite
Performance Achievement Level

School

Rank

Rank Range

Composite Performance Achievement Level

School J

1

10% or Less

1

School S

2

10% or Less

1

School D

3

10.1 to 50%

2

School F

4

10.1 to 50%

2

School G

5

10.1 to 50%

2

School B

6

10.1 to 50%

2

School A

7

10.1 to 50%

2

School C

8

10.1 to 50%

2

School R

9

10.1 to 50%

2

School T

10

10.1 to 50%

2

School N

11

50.1 to 75%

3

School O

12

50.1 to 75%

3

School I

13

50.1 to 75%

3

School L

14

50.1 to 75%

3

School Q

16

50.1 to 75%

3

School K

15

Greater than 75%

4

School H

17

Greater than 75%

4

School E

18

Greater than 75%

4

School M

19

Greater than 75%

4

School P

20

Greater than 75%

4

III. NCLB Accountability

Overview

Pursuant to its last renewed Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) waiver, the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identified a set of Priority and Focus schools during the 2015‑16 school year, based on data from the 2014‑15 school year and other prior years. Priority and Focus schools were eligible to be removed from these designations in the 2017‑18 school year if they made progress for two consecutive school years (2016‑17 and 2017‑18), met certain minimum standards, and met participation requirements for all student subgroups for which they are accountable. The ESEA waiver expired at the end of 2017‑18 school year, which was the last year that schools would be identified (i.e. LAP, Reward) or de-identified (Priority, Focus) under the NCLB era accountability system.

Designations

Priority

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identified Title I or Title I-eligible schools as Priority if they were among the 5% lowest performing schools in the state based on the following factors: low achievement in the “All Students” group in terms of proficiency on the statewide assessments and a lack of progress for this group over a number of years; or, secondary schools with a graduation rate less than 60 percent for a number of years. These schools were initially identified in 2012‑13 and newly identified again in 2015‑16. Schools identified as Priority during the last round of identification were removed from status in 2017‑18 if they made two years of progress and met other additional criteria.

Focus

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identified Title I or Title I-eligible schools as Focus if they were among the 10% lowest performing schools as measured by accountability subgroup performance based on the following factors: the lowest subgroup achievement in terms of proficiency on the statewide assessments or high schools with the lowest graduation rate for subgroups. These schools were initially identified in 2012‑13 and newly identified again in 2015‑16. Schools identified as Focus during the last round of identification were removed from status in 2017‑18 if they made two years of progress and met other additional criteria.

Local Assistance Plan

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identified schools as Local Assistance Plan (LAP) for either for failing to make progress in ELA, Math, Science or Graduation Rate for a subgroup for multiple years, having large and increasing gaps in performance between specific subgroups of students or in the case where the school is not located in a low performing district, having a subgroup perform at or below the benchmark used to identify low performing districts. Schools were identified as LAP any year, however the last round of LAP identification happened in 2016‑17.

Good Standing

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department used Good Standing as the default designations for schools not identified as Priority, Focus, Reward or LAP.

Reward

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identified schools as Reward for showing high performance or high progress in ELA, Math, Science and graduation rate. Schools were identified as Reward any year, however the last round of Reward school identification happened in the 2016‑17 school year.

Metrics

Combined ELA/Math Performance Index at the Elementary-Middle Level

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) primarily identified elementary-middle schools as Priority or Focus based on the Combined ELA/Math Performance Index. The Combined ELA/Math Performance Index was an average of the ELA Performance Index and the Math Performance Index, both of which were values on a scale of 0-200 and calculated by summing the count of students performing at level 2, plus the count of students performing at level 3 times 2, plus the count of students performing at level 4 times 2 and then dividing this sum by the total count of continuously enrolled and tested students. 

Combined ELA/Math Performance Index at the Secondary Level

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) primarily identified secondary schools as Priority or Focus based on the Combined ELA/Math Performance Index. The Combined ELA/Math Performance Index was an average of the ELA Performance Index and the Math Performance Index, both of which were values on a scale of 0-200 and calculated by summing the count of students performing at level 2, plus the count of students performing at level 3 times 2, plus the count of students performing at level 4 times 2 and then dividing this sum by the total count of students in the accountability cohort.

Total Cohort Graduation Rate for Accountability Purposes

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era accountability the New York State Education Department (NYSED) primarily identified secondary schools as Priority or Focus based on the four year total cohort graduation rate for accountability. This graduation rate was lagged by one year and also included former students with disabilities and former Limited English Proficient students. Additionally a five year total cohort graduation rate for accountability was used. This graduation rate was also lagged by one year and included former students with disabilities and former Limited English Proficient students.