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State Accountability Resource Tool (StART) Educator Guide

Introduction

The NYCDOE State Accountability Resource Tool (StART) shares publicly available New York State Education Department (NYSED) accountability data for New York City public schools in an intuitive and user-friendly way. The StART links to other school performance tools such as the School Performance Dashboard, School Quality Guide, Renewal/Receivership Reports as well as New York state’s https://data.nysed.gov public reporting site.

The StART is organized into three different modules that focus on a different aspect of publicly available state accountability data:

This Educator Guide is a companion to the StART and provides more detailed information about New York State’s school accountability system including metrics, designations and terms.

ESSA Accountability

Overview

In December 2015 President Obama signed into law the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). ESSA required that states submit plans that outlined how they would implement requirements under ESSA including those related to how schools would be held accountability for performance. The New York State Education Department (NYSED) submitted its plan to the United States Department of Education (USDE) in September 2017 and received final approval for its plan from USDE in January 2018.

ESSA replaces the previous identification system and categories (Priority Schools, Focus Districts and Focus Schools, Local Assistance Plan Schools and Reward Schools - for more information on No Child Left Behind, see NCLB in the Appendix below) with Comprehensive Support & Improvement (CSI) Schools, Targeted Support & Improvement (TSI) Schools, Target Districts and Recognition Schools using a new identification process. The new identification process takes on a multiple measures approach and includes academic and non-academic measures of school performance. This new identification process will be implemented in school year 2018‑19 (based on data from the 2017‑18 school year and data from other prior years). As a result a new round of school designations will be made in school year 2018‑19.

The ESSA law requires each state to identify at least five percent of schools as in need of “Comprehensive Support and Improvement” based on poor performance on exam results, exam participation, graduation (for HS), and at least one other indicator which may be non-academic (e.g. chronic absenteeism). Using the same methods described above for identifying schools for Comprehensive Support and Improvement, NYSED will also identify schools that have accountability subgroups that are consistently underperforming as Targeted Support & Improvement, which will be required to develop and implement a school-level targeted support and improvement plan.

Under New York State’s new accountability system there are six measures at the elementary-middle school level:

There are seven accountability measures at the secondary level:

Performance on these measures is converted to an Achievement Level that ranges in value from 1 to 4. The achievement levels are then used to determine which of the aforementioned state accountability designations (Recognition, CSI and TSI) a school will receive. It is also important to note that schools can be identified to receive interventions if they demonstrate low performance (i.e. achievement level is equal to 1) on any accountability measure or if a school has consistently low participation rates on statewide assessments.

Metrics

Elementary-Middle Level Composite Performance Index (EMS Only)

Indicator Inclusion Rules

To be included in this calculation, a student must be continuously enrolled (i.e., enrolled on BEDS day and through test administration period) and be enrolled in grades 3-8.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 student test results combined for ELA, Math and Science is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated. If there are less than 30 student test results in the current year, data from the prior year will be combined to help the school meet the n-size requirement. If after combining data from the current and prior years the student group meets the n-size requirement the state will calculate performance on this measure.

Summary

The Composite Performance Index (CPI) metric at the elementary and middle school level measures achievement on state assessments in ELA, math and science for all students and each accountability subgroup. The CPI metric uses two sets of performance indices (PIs).

A school’s performance on the two sets of PIs (Core Subject Performance Index and Weighted Academic Achievement Index) is ranked separately and then converted to an achievement level using the table shown below.

Performance Index Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

The two achievement levels are then combined resulting in a value of 2-8 to create the Composite Performance Index (CPI). A final rank is then performed on the CPI by first sorting schools using their combined achievement level (value from 2-8) and then by taking the value of the higher ranked set of PIs (Core Subject Performance Index or Weighted Academic Achievement Index). Using the same table shared above, schools are assigned a level 1-4 achievement level for the Composite Performance Index.

For more information on how to calculate CPI see the Appendix.

Secondary Level Composite Performance Index (HS Only)

Indicator Inclusion Rules

Students must be part of the 4-Year Accountability Cohort as of June 30th of the current reporting year in ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 student test results combined for ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated. If there are less than 30 student test results in the current year, data from the prior year will be combined to help the school meet the n-size requirement. If after combining data from the current and prior years the student group meets the n-size requirement the state will calculate performance on this measure.

Summary

The Composite Performance Index (CPI) metric at the secondary level measures the achievement on state assessments in ELA, math, science and social studies for each student subgroup. Using the high school accountability cohort as the denominator a PI ranging in value from 0 to 250 is calculated for ELA, math, science and social studies separately. The CPI is then calculated by taking a weighted average (ELA and math PIs are given a weight of 3, science PI a weight of 2 and social studies PI a weight of 1) of these four PIs. A school’s performance on the CPI metric is ranked against the performance of all secondary level schools across the state and converted to an achievement level using the table shown below.

Performance Index Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

For more information on how to calculate CPI see the Appendix.

Growth (EMS Only)

Indicator Inclusion Rules

In order to be attributed to the Mean Growth Percentile, students must be continuously enrolled (i.e., they are enrolled on BEDS Day in the fall and assessment day in the spring). Only students who took the test in the previous grade level in the previous year and the next sequential grade level in the current year are included.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 student growth percentile (SGP) values combined in ELA and Math across three years for a student group is needed in order to compute performance on this measure.

Summary

The Growth (Mean Growth Percentile) measure at the elementary and middle school is a three-year average of ELA and math Student Growth Percentiles (SGPs) values calculated for each student subgroup. More specifically the value for this measure is calculated by summing the SGPs in ELA and math for 2017-18, 2016-17 and 2015-16 and dividing the result by the total count of SGPs in ELA and math for 2017-18, 2016-17 and 2015-16. A school’s resulting performance is then ranked against the performance of all schools in the state and assigned an achievement level using the table below.

Growth Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

45 or Less

1

45.1 to 50

2

50.1 to 54

3

Greater than 54

4

For more information on the Growth measure see Measuring Student Growth for Institutional Accountability in New York.

4-Year, 5-Year and 6-Year Graduation Rate for Accountability Purposes (HS Only)

Indicator Inclusion Rules

Students must be part of the 4-Year, 5-Year or 6-Year Graduation Rate Total Cohort for Accountability as of August of the prior reporting year. Note that graduation rate for accountability purposes is lagged by one year. As an example, for the 2018-19 reporting year graduation rates from Cohort T (4-Year), Cohort S (5-Year) and Cohort R (6-Year) will be used for performance calculations.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 students in each graduation rate cohort for accountability is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated for a student group. If there are less than 30 student in a given cohort, data from the prior year will be combined to help the school meet the n-size requirement. If after combining data from the current and prior years the student group meets the n-size requirement the state will calculate performance on this measure.

Summary

At the secondary level the Four-Year Graduation Rate Cohort, Five-Year Graduation Rate Cohort and Six-Year Graduation Rate Cohort are used as a measure of performance in three distinct ways:

67% Rule

Secondary schools that do not have a Four-, Five-, or Six-Year Graduation Rate Cohort with a graduation rate at or above 67% will be automatically identified as Comprehensive Support & Improvement (CSI).

Stand Alone Graduation Rate Metric

There is a stand-alone Graduation Rate metric that measures a school’s Four-, Five-, and Six-Year Cohorts graduation rate performance against state long-term goals and state and school Measures of Interim Progress (MIPs).

Graduation Rate for Combined Measure

Finally, the state will rank each school’s graduation rate for the Four-, Five-, and Six-Year Cohorts against the performance of all schools statewide separately. It will then assign an achievement level for each cohort and then average them together and round to the nearest whole number to determine which schools are the lowest-performing (bottom 10%) for the Combined measure.

Combined Measure

Elementary-Middle Level

At the elementary-middle level the Combined measure is the sum of the rank order of the Composite Performance Index (CPI) and the rank order of the Growth measure. The sum is then ranked itself. Schools are assigned an achievement level using the table below. If the unweighted average of the Composite Performance Level and the Student Growth Level rounded down is greater than the Level resulting from the above table, the unweighted average of the Composite Performance Level and Student Growth Level rounded down shall be assigned as the Combined Composite Performance and Growth Level.

Combined Percentile Rank to Achievement Level

Rank

Level

10% or Less

1

10.1 to 50%

2

50.1 to 75%

3

Greater than 75%

4

Secondary Level

At the secondary level the Combined measure is the sum of the rank order of the Composite Performance Index (CPI) and the rank order of the Graduation Rate measure. The sum is then ranked itself. Schools are assigned an achievement level using the same table above.

Academic (ELA/Math) Progress

Indicator Inclusion Rules

At the elementary/middle level a student must be continuously enrolled (i.e., enrolled on BEDS day and through test administration period) and be enrolled in grades 3-8 in order to be included in this measure. At the secondary level a student must be part of the 4-Year Accountability Cohort as of June 30th of the current reporting year in ELA and Math.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 student test results for ELA and Math separately is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated. If there are less than 30 student test results in the current year, data from the prior year will be combined to help the school meet the n-size requirement. If after combining data from the current and prior years the student group meets the n-size requirement for ELA and Math separately the state will calculate performance for ELA Progress and Math Progress.

Summary

The Academic Progress or ELA/Math Progress metric measures how a student subgroup performs in ELA and math as reflected in the ELA and Math Performance Index calculated for the Weighted Average Achievement Index. Performance on the ELA and Math Performance Index is then compared to the state’s long-term goals and Measure of Interim Progress (MIP) and the school-specific MIP for that subgroup in a given school year. Schools are assigned an achievement level separately for the ELA PI and Math PI using the table below.

empty table cell

Did Not Meet State Long-Term Goal

Met State Long-Term Goal

Exceeded State Long-Term Goal

Did not meet MIP

1

NA

NA

Met lower MIP

2

3

4

Met higher MIP

3

4

4

The two achievement levels are then averaged together and rounded down to determine an overall achievement level for this measure.

ELL Progress

Indicator Inclusion Rules

At the elementary/middle and secondary level a student must be continuously enrolled (i.e., enrolled on BEDS day and through test administration period) and have a current and prior year NYSESLAT result. Continuously enrolled students who scored commanding on their first NYSESLAT administration are also included.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 student test results is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated. If there are less than 30 student test results in the current year, data from the prior year will be combined to help the school meet the n-size requirement. If after combining data from the current and prior years the student group meets the n-size requirement the state will calculate performance on this measure.

Summary

The English Language Proficiency (ELP) Progress metric measures the progress of English Language Learners (ELLs) in meeting their individual goals on the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT) using a Success Ratio. Continuously enrolled ELLs with a current and prior year NYSESLAT are counted in the denominator of the Success Ratio while only students who make annual progress towards meeting their expected goals towards English Language Proficiency are included in the numerator of the Success Ratio.

For more information on the ELP progress measure see New York State's ESSA Plan for Growth in English Language Proficiency (ELP) Webinar.

Chronic Absenteeism

Indicator Inclusion Rules

To be included in this calculation, a student must be enrolled in a school or district for a minimum of ten instructional days that school year and be in attendance at least one of those days. Suspensions are not counted as excused or unexcused absences, as suspended students are required to be provided with instruction while they are suspended.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 students is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated for a student group. If there are less than 30 students in the current year, data from the prior year will be combined to help the school meet the n-size requirement. If after combining data from the current and prior years the student group meets the n-size requirement the state will calculate performance on this measure.

Summary

The Chronic Absenteeism (CA) metric measures the percentage of students, for each student subgroup who miss 10% or more of the school year against state long-term goals and state and school MIPs. This is the one indicator for which more than one school can be accountable for a student in a given school year.

College, Career & Civic Readiness Index (HS Only)

Indicator Inclusion Rules

To be included in this calculation, a student must be a part of member of the 4-Year Graduation Rate Cohort as of June 30th of the reporting year.

N-Size Requirement

A minimum of 30 students is needed for performance on this measure to be calculated for a student group. If the current reporting year 4-year graduation rate cohort (e.g., 2014 4-year grad rate cohort) plus the number of students not in that cohort but who are English Language Learners (ELLs) and earned a Regents Diploma and a Seal of Biliteracy is less than 30, the number of students in the current year is added to the prior reporting year’s 4-year graduation rate cohort. If the 2- year sum is still less than 30, no index is calculated for the subgroup and the school/district is not accountable for that subgroup.

Summary

The College, Career & Civic Readiness Index (CCCRI) metric at the secondary level measures the percentage of students in the accountability cohort who are leaving school prepared for college, career and civic readiness as measured by diplomas, credentials, advanced course credits and enrollment, career and technical education certifications, high school equivalency diplomas and other similar indicators against State long-term goals and State and school MIPs. Each measure within the CCCR Index is weighted based on the table below:

Achievement Order of Precedence and Weighting

Order of Precedence

CCCR Achievement

Weight

1

Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation

2.0

2

Regents Diploma or Local Diploma with CTE Endorsement

2.0

3

Cohort Regents Diploma with Seal of Biliteracy

2.0

4

Annual Regents Diploma with Seal of Biliteracy

2.0

5

Regents Diploma and a score of 3 or higher on an AP Exam

2.0

6

Regents Diploma and a score of 4 or higher on IB exam

2.0

7

Regents Diploma and P-Tech credit

2.0

8

Regents Diploma and high school dual enrollment credit

2.0

9

(2018‑19 and beyond) Regents Diploma and the receipt of an industry-recognized credential or passage of nationally certified CTE examination

2.0

10

Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential with an average score of 4 on the New York State Alternate Assessment Examinations (NYSAA) in language arts, mathematics, and science.

2.0

11

Regents Diploma and high school credit earned through an AP or IB enrollment course

1.5

12

Regents Diploma with CDOS endorsement

1.5

13

Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential with an average score of 3 on the New York State Alternate Assessment Examinations (NYSAA) in language arts, mathematics, and science

1.5

14

Regents Diploma

1.0

15

Local Diploma

1.0

16

Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential with an average score of 2 on the New York State Alternate Assessment Examinations (NYSAA) in language arts, mathematics, and science

1.0

17

High School Equivalency Diploma

0.5

18

CDOS Credential

0.5

19

No High School or High School Equivalency Diploma

0.0

Performance for Schools who Do Not Meet N-Size Requirements on Academic Measures

If after combining data for the past two years a school does not meet the minimum N-size requirement for a subgroup for the Academic Achievement measure the school will be held accountable using the established accountability process for small schools (i.e. Self Assessment).

If a subgroup does not meet the N-size requirement for the Growth measure, a subgroup’s initial designation will be determined using the Academic Achievement measure only. As an example, if the subgroup is identified as Level 1 for Academic Achievement it will also be identified as Level 1 for the Combined (Academic Achievement & Growth) measure.

If an achievement level is calculated for the Combined measure for a subgroup using the process described above and the subgroup meets N-size requirements for at least one of the following measures, an accountability designation will be made using the available measures.

If an achievement level is calculated for the Combined measure for a subgroup using the process described above and the subgroup does not meet N-size requirements for none of the measures listed above then the school will be held accountable using the established accountability process for small schools (i.e. Self Assessment).

For Graduation Rate, if the number of students in the 4-, 5-, or 6-year cohort as of June in the prior year is less than 30, the number of students in the cohort two years prior to the current reporting year are added. If the combined count is less than 30, no 4-, 5-, or 6-year graduation rate is calculated for the subgroup and the school/district is not accountable for that subgroup.

If a subgroup does not meet the N-size requirement for the Graduation Rate measure, a subgroup’s initial designation will be determined using the Academic Achievement measure only. As an example if the subgroup is identified as Level 1 for Academic Achievement then the subgroup will also be identified as Level 1 for the Combined (Academic Achievement & Graduation Rate) measure.

Self-Assessment Process

More information about the Self-Assessment Process for schools that do not meet N-size requirements for performance calculations will be shared at a later date. Schools subject to the Self-Assessment process includes new elementary/middle schools that did not have a sufficient number of students tested in grades 3-8 in the 2017-18 school year as well as new high schools that did not have a graduating cohort in 2017-18.

Participation Rate for ELA and Math State Assessments

At the elementary/middle level New York State requires a student to have a minimum of 40 students enrolled during the test administration period in order to calculate a participation rate. For more information on participation on grade 3-8 exams see (FAQ) Student Participation in Grades 3-8 New York State Tests.

At the secondary level a minimum of 40 students in the accountability cohort is required to calculate a participation rate in ELA and Math. In the current that there are less than 40 students in the current year, and prior year is combined. If after combining data from the current and prior year the student group meets the n-size requirement the state will calculate a participation rate.

Participation Rate Improvement Plan

Schools that meet minimum N size requirements for calculating a participation rate for ELA and Math (as described above) and meet all of the criteria below are required to create a Participation Rate Improvement Plan (PRIP) to be implemented for the 2019-20 school year.

  1. The subgroup failed to meet the 95% participation rate requirement in the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years.
  2. The subgroup did not show improvement in participation rate between the 2016-17 and 2017-18 school years and the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years.
  3. The subgroup performed at Level 1 or 2 on the Weighted Average Achievement Index (or CPI if a high school) in the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years.

Schools that fail to meet the 95% participation rate requirement and rank in the bottom 10% of participation across the State will be required to submit their self-assessment and PRIP to NYSED for the Commissioner’s approval no less than three months prior to the next test administration period.

Schools identified as CSI or TSI cannot be removed from status if they are Level 1 on the Weighted Average Achievement Index (or CPI if a high school) and required to create a Participation Rate Improvement Plan in 2020-21.

Designations

Comprehensive Support & Improvement Schools (CSI)

The CSI designation is used to identify the lowest-performing schools in New York state based on the performance of all students. There are three ways that schools can be identified as CSI:

The Decision Rules used to identify schools as low performing are shown below for elementary-middle level and secondary level schools.

Elementary-Middle CSI Decision Rules

Scenario

Composite Performance

Growth

Combined

ELP Progress

Academic Progress

Chronic Absenteeism

1

Both Level 1

Level 1

Any

Automatically identified

2

Any One Level 1

Level 1

None

Either one Level 1

3

Any One Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Automatically identified

4

Any One Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Either one Level 1

5

Any One Level 1

Level 1

Level 3-4

Both Level 1

Secondary Level CSI Decision Rules

Scenario

Composite Performance

Graduation Rate

Combined

ELL Progress

Academic Progress

Chronic Absenteeism

CCCRI

1

Both Level 1

Level 1

Any

Automatically identified

2

Either one Level 1

Level 1

None

Any one Level 1

3

Either one Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Automatically identified

4

Either one Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Any one Level 1

5

Either one Level 1

Level 1

Level 3-4

Any two Level 1

Schools will first be identified as CSI in the 2018‑19 school year based on data from 2017‑18 and other prior years. CSI schools are identified every three years so after 2018‑19 the next time schools will be designated as CSI is in the 2021‑22 school year and the 2024-25 school year after that. In order to be removed from status, schools designated as CSI must show progress for two consecutive years by having performance above that used to identify CSI schools. Schools that fail to be removed from status and are re-identified as a CSI school during the next identification year (i.e. 2021‑22, 2024‑25, etc.) will also be identified as a Receivership School and subject to additional intervention and performance requirements. Receivership Schools are subject to closure or independent Receivership if they fail to meet annual performance requirements. 

CSI Exit Criteria

To exit CSI status, a CSI school must, for two consecutive years, be above the levels that would cause it to be identified for CSI status. Schools may exit CSI status if, for two consecutive years:

Targeted Support & Improvement Schools (TSI)

The TSI designation is used to identify the lowest performing schools in New York State based on the performance of the accountability subgroups. The Decision Rules used to identify schools as CSI (see tables above) are applied to the performance of the accountability subgroups in order to determine if they are low performing and designated as TSI.

Schools currently designated as Priority or Focus can be identified as TSI beginning in the 2018‑19 school year based on data from 2017‑18 with the possibility of all other schools being identified as TSI beginning in the 2019-20 school year. Unlike CSI, schools can be identified as TSI any school year. In order to be removed from status schools designated as TSI are required to show progress for two consecutive years by having performance that is above the levels that would cause the school to be identified for a low-performing subgroup of students. In addition the school must not be newly identified for any subgroup of students. Schools that do meet the removal criteria will remain identified as TSI If a school remains identified as TSI after three consecutive years it will be identified as a CSI school.

TSI Exit Criteria

To exit TSI status, a TSI school must, for two consecutive years, be above the levels that would cause it to be identified for TSI status. Schools may exit TSI status if, for two consecutive years:

Good Standing

The Good Standing designation is the default accountability designation for schools in New York State. Schools that are not identified as low performing (CSI, TSI) or that demonstrate high performance/progress (Recognition) will be identified as Good Standing. The majority of New York City Schools are designated as Good Standing each year.

Recognition

Schools that have demonstrated high performance or progress are identified as Recognition Schools. The Recognition School designation replaces the Reward School designation under NYSED’s NCLB era accountability system. In order to be identified as Recognition a school must be in Good Standing (i.e. not identified as CSI, TSI or PTSI), the All Student group must have at least a 95% participation rate for ELA and Math exams and have an achievement level of 4 on the Combined measure in addition to having an achievement level 4 on other measures. A school cannot be identified if it has a Level 1 for any measure. The full set of business rules provides more information on all the criteria used to identify Recognition Schools in 2018-19. 

Intervention Programs for Low Performing Schools

Receivership Program

The Receivership School program is an intervention program for schools that the New York State Education Department (NYSED) identifies as low performing. There are 12 schools under Receivership. These schools were identified based on the following criteria: